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Princess Lamia says, it is time to apply the lessons of COVID-19 humanitarian crisis

29/06/2021

Princess Lamia bint Majed Al-Saud recently said, Alwaleed Philanthropies has ridden the wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and is set to accelerate its strategy of “creative philanthropy” as the global recovery gathers pace, according to the woman in charge of the Riyadh-headquartered Saudi charitable organization.

Princess Lamia bint Majed Al-Saud, secretary-general of the 40-year-old organization set up by Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, told Arab News that the pandemic had been a demanding time for the organization as it faced extraordinary demands on its resources, but that the time had come to apply the lessons learned during the humanitarian and economic crisis.

“The United Nations came out with a very unique name for doing good in the world, which is ‘creative economy.’ So, you have to be very creative moving forward after the pandemic — how you’re going to reach your beneficiaries, and how you can provide support, and how you can empower and do good in general,” she said.

Her comments came in the course of an interview with “Frankly Speaking,” the series of video interviews with leading policymakers and thinkers in the Middle East and the world.

Princess Lamia, who is regarded as a role model for the empowerment of women in Saudi Arabia under the reforms of the Vision 2030 strategy, also spoke of the progress women have made in the Kingdom, the place of art and culture in the global philanthropy scene, and the need to transcend the “clash of civilizations” approach to relations between the Islamic world and its international neighbors.

Alwaleed Philanthropies responded after the outbreak of the virus last year with a $30 million initiative to provide essential medical goods and services to poorer countries around the world struggling with their pandemic response.

This was on top of Alwaleed Philanthropies’ regular commitment to vaccination programs around the world, and its domestic and international program of medical and humanitarian assistance.

Princess Lamia bint Majed Al Saud

“We actually worked in some countries in Africa, we worked in Iraq, we worked in Syria, we worked in Tunisia, we worked in Yemen. We provided economic support — so, for example in Africa, we collaborated with the Islamic World Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (ICESCO) to build small factories to produce masks (and improve) sanitation. It was in favor of empowering women and youth,” said Princess Lamia.

“I think the pandemic shows the importance of having a house and to have a roof over your head. All you need to be safe from COVID is only a room and a roof over your head, and that’s why we worked with Habitat (a UN urban organization) in shelters in Yemen, Iraq and Syria.”
This was in addition to Alwaleed Philanthropies’ established collaboration with the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.

“I’d say it was a quite creative initiative that we covered, and we actually reached over 100 million people around the world,” Princess Lamia said.

Alwaleed Philanthropies works in four main areas — community development, empowering women and youth, providing vital disaster relief and bridging cultures — which combined have benefited close to 1 billion people around the world.

One big learning point from the pandemic was the move to online and digital philanthropic support, with projects in Myanmar and at home in Saudi Arabia going online as lockdowns hit.

“Believe it or not, from a money perspective or a budget perspective, it’s much easier and that’s why maybe this year we reached more people,” Princess Lamia said.

Some observers have been concerned that the intense focus on finding and administering a vaccine against the novel coronavirus might divert attention from other global inoculation programs against infectious diseases such as polio, where Alwaleed Philanthropies has played a big role in vaccination programs in developing countries.

Princess Lamia said there had only been a limited effect. “I agree that at Alwaleed Philanthropies, we transferred some of our funds to COVID-19 due to the urgency of the pandemic, but I don’t think it will have an effect in the long run,” she added. “I believe we’re in a good place now, after having the vaccine against COVID and doing much more research.”

She said Prince Alwaleed varied his contribution to the overall budget “if he sees it’s necessary.” Alwaleed Philanthropies works alongside other big global philanthropies such as the Gates Foundation as well as UN agencies, but is not in competition with them, she insisted.

“I wouldn’t say compete. I’d say we learn from each other, the methodology of this foundation, or the core spirit of this foundation. It’s built on partnership, and this is what Prince Alwaleed believes in — partnership,” she said.

Alwaleed Philanthropies’ international connections have direct benefits for its work in Saudi Arabia. “Maybe what differentiates us from a domestic perspective more than any other foundation in Saudi Arabia is that we have the international experience and expertise, and that’s what we’re trying to do in our projects in Saudi Arabia — transferring knowledge from what we did outside,” she said.

One example is the Turquoise Mountain initiative, backed by the UK’s prince of Wales, which seeks to encourage and promote traditional crafts in various parts of the world, including Saudi Arabia, where some 1,000 mainly female artisans are employed in craft workshops producing high-end goods, most recently under the Mizwada brand.

“We’re upscaling their knowledge. We’re taking the crafts from a very modest or very humble craft to a luxury brand,” Princess Lamia said.

Female empowerment has been one of the main themes of Alwaleed Philanthropies in the Kingdom, and she believes great strides have been made for women in recent years, with the freedom to drive, the relaxation of guardianship laws and greater female employment opportunities.

“I don’t think three or four years ago I’d be sitting and talking with you,” she said, adding that Western media had not given the Kingdom credit for the big advances.

The rise to prominence of a number of women in the Kingdom — such as Princess Reema bint Bandar, Saudi ambassador to Washington, and Sarah Al-Suhaimy, chairperson of the Saudi Stock Exchange (Tadawul) — is further evidence of female empowerment, Princess Lamia said.

Alwaleed Philanthropies is run by a 10-strong team of women appointed by Prince Alwaleed, and it has programs to cultivate the skills necessary for women to enter employment in the private and public sectors.

“It was very clearly announced from the government that we want to support women and we want to empower women. I think some of the entities or the companies took it to a next level in which they literally discarded the men, but I believe that we should empower humans,” she said.

One big part of Alwaleed Philanthropies’ work is the effort to promote better understanding between the Islamic world and other belief systems, which has been controversially called a “clash of civilizations.”

Pointing to the global confrontations after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the US in 2001, Princess Lamia said: “I believe this clash isn’t that easy to resolve.” She spoke of how Prince Alwaleed — a well-known investor on Wall Street — was in New York at the time of the tragedy, and decided to do something to help ease long-term tensions.

“That’s why we collaborated with six of the most prominent, I’d say important, universities around the world. We actually created centers for research and promotion of tolerance and understanding,” she said.

There are now Alwaleed centers in six of the most prestigious universities in the US, Europe and the Middle East, part of what she called a “soft power” initiative to reconcile misunderstanding between people of different faiths around the world.

The other angle is Alwaleed Philanthropies’ promotion of art and culture as a bridge between religions. It has established partnerships with the Louvre in Paris and the Pergamon Museum in Berlin to showcase works of Islamic art, but with a universal message.

“That’s how you create awareness of how Islamic cultures were — leaning toward art and beauty,” Princess Lamia said.

This article was first published in BLiTZ

If you want more interesting news or videos of this website click on this link  BLiTZ Home

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‘We have to be very creative moving forward’ post pandemic, says Princess Lamia of Alwaleed Philanthropies

28/06/2021

Princess Lamia bint Majed Al-Saud, secretary-general of Alwaleed Philanthropies, speaks to Frank Kane. (Screenshot) 

  • Head of Saudi charitable organization says it is time to apply the lessons of COVID-19 humanitarian crisis
  • Appearing on “Frankly Speaking,” Princess Lamia also discussed women’s progress in KSA among other topics

DUBAI: Alwaleed Philanthropies has ridden the wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and is set to accelerate its strategy of “creative philanthropy” as the global recovery gathers pace, according to the woman in charge of the Riyadh-headquartered Saudi charitable organization.

Princess Lamia bint Majed Al-Saud, secretary-general of the 40-year-old organization set up by Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, told Arab News that the pandemic had been a demanding time for the organization as it faced extraordinary demands on its resources, but that the time had come to apply the lessons learned during the humanitarian and economic crisis.

“The United Nations came out with a very unique name for doing good in the world, which is ‘creative economy.’ So, you have to be very creative moving forward after the pandemic — how you’re going to reach your beneficiaries, and how you can provide support, and how you can empower and do good in general,” she said.

Her comments came in the course of an interview with “Frankly Speaking,” the series of video interviews with leading policymakers and thinkers in the Middle East and the world.

Princess Lamia, who is regarded as a role model for the empowerment of women in Saudi Arabia under the reforms of the Vision 2030 strategy, also spoke of the progress women have made in the Kingdom, the place of art and culture in the global philanthropy scene, and the need to transcend the “clash of civilizations” approach to relations between the Islamic world and its international neighbors.

Alwaleed Philanthropies responded after the outbreak of the virus last year with a $30 million initiative to provide essential medical goods and services to poorer countries around the world struggling with their pandemic response.

This was on top of Alwaleed Philanthropies’ regular commitment to vaccination programs around the world, and its domestic and international program of medical and humanitarian assistance.

Princess Lamia bint Majed Al-Saud, secretary-general of Alwaleed Philanthropies, is pictured in Riyadh. (AN photo by Ziyad Alarfaj) 

“We actually worked in some countries in Africa, we worked in Iraq, we worked in Syria, we worked in Tunisia, we worked in Yemen. We provided economic support — so, for example in Africa, we collaborated with the Islamic World Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (ICESCO) to build small factories to produce masks (and improve) sanitation. It was in favor of empowering women and youth,” said Princess Lamia.

“I think the pandemic shows the importance of having a house and to have a roof over your head. All you need to be safe from COVID is only a room and a roof over your head, and that’s why we worked with Habitat (a UN urban organization) in shelters in Yemen, Iraq and Syria.”

This was in addition to Alwaleed Philanthropies’ established collaboration with the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.

“I’d say it was a quite creative initiative that we covered, and we actually reached over 100 million people around the world,” Princess Lamia said.

Alwaleed Philanthropies works in four main areas — community development, empowering women and youth, providing vital disaster relief and bridging cultures — which combined have benefited close to 1 billion people around the world.

One big learning point from the pandemic was the move to online and digital philanthropic support, with projects in Myanmar and at home in Saudi Arabia going online as lockdowns hit.
“Believe it or not, from a money perspective or a budget perspective, it’s much easier and that’s why maybe this year we reached more people,” Princess Lamia said.

Princess Lamia bint Majed Al-Saud, secretary-general of Alwaleed Philanthropies, is pictured in Riyadh. (AN photo by Ziyad Alarfaj) 

Some observers have been concerned that the intense focus on finding and administering a vaccine against the novel coronavirus might divert attention from other global inoculation programs against infectious diseases such as polio, where Alwaleed Philanthropies has played a big role in vaccination programs in developing countries.

Princess Lamia said there had only been a limited effect. “I agree that at Alwaleed Philanthropies, we transferred some of our funds to COVID-19 due to the urgency of the pandemic, but I don’t think it will have an effect in the long run,” she added. “I believe we’re in a good place now, after having the vaccine against COVID and doing much more research.”

She said Prince Alwaleed varied his contribution to the overall budget “if he sees it’s necessary.” Alwaleed Philanthropies works alongside other big global philanthropies such as the Gates Foundation as well as UN agencies, but is not in competition with them, she insisted.

“I wouldn’t say compete. I’d say we learn from each other, the methodology of this foundation, or the core spirit of this foundation. It’s built on partnership, and this is what Prince Alwaleed believes in — partnership,” she said.

Alwaleed Philanthropies’ international connections have direct benefits for its work in Saudi Arabia. “Maybe what differentiates us from a domestic perspective more than any other foundation in Saudi Arabia is that we have the international experience and expertise, and that’s what we’re trying to do in our projects in Saudi Arabia — transferring knowledge from what we did outside,” she said.

One example is the Turquoise Mountain initiative, backed by the UK’s prince of Wales, which seeks to encourage and promote traditional crafts in various parts of the world, including Saudi Arabia, where some 1,000 mainly female artisans are employed in craft workshops producing high-end goods, most recently under the Mizwada brand.

“We’re upscaling their knowledge. We’re taking the crafts from a very modest or very humble craft to a luxury brand,” Princess Lamia said.

Female empowerment has been one of the main themes of Alwaleed Philanthropies in the Kingdom, and she believes great strides have been made for women in recent years, with the freedom to drive, the relaxation of guardianship laws and greater female employment opportunities.

“I don’t think three or four years ago I’d be sitting and talking with you,” she said, adding that Western media had not given the Kingdom credit for the big advances.

The rise to prominence of a number of women in the Kingdom — such as Princess Reema bint Bandar, Saudi ambassador to Washington, and Sarah Al-Suhaimy, chairperson of the Saudi Stock Exchange (Tadawul) — is further evidence of female empowerment, Princess Lamia said.

Alwaleed Philanthropies is run by a 10-strong team of women appointed by Prince Alwaleed, and it has programs to cultivate the skills necessary for women to enter employment in the private and public sectors.

Secretary-general of Alwaleed Philanthropies Princess Lamia bint Majed Al-Saud. (Screenshot) 

“It was very clearly announced from the government that we want to support women and we want to empower women. I think some of the entities or the companies took it to a next level in which they literally discarded the men, but I believe that we should empower humans,” she said.
One big part of Alwaleed Philanthropies’ work is the effort to promote better understanding between the Islamic world and other belief systems, which has been controversially called a “clash of civilizations.”
Pointing to the global confrontations after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the US in 2001, Princess Lamia said: “I believe this clash isn’t that easy to resolve.” She spoke of how Prince Alwaleed — a well-known investor on Wall Street — was in New York at the time of the tragedy, and decided to do something to help ease long-term tensions.
“That’s why we collaborated with six of the most prominent, I’d say important, universities around the world. We actually created centers for research and promotion of tolerance and understanding,” she said.
There are now Alwaleed centers in six of the most prestigious universities in the US, Europe and the Middle East, part of what she called a “soft power” initiative to reconcile misunderstanding between people of different faiths around the world.
The other angle is Alwaleed Philanthropies’ promotion of art and culture as a bridge between religions. It has established partnerships with the Louvre in Paris and the Pergamon Museum in Berlin to showcase works of Islamic art, but with a universal message.
“That’s how you create awareness of how Islamic cultures were — leaning toward art and beauty,” Princess Lamia said.
Twitter: @frankkanedubai

This article was first published in Arab News

If you want more interesting news or videos of this website click on this link  Arab News Home

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Saudi’s Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Is Business Savvy and Here’s How

13/06/2021

Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal is the grandson of the founder of Saudi Arabia and is not just a prince by title. The Saudi Arabian Prince is a business man who knows a lucrative deal when he sees one, and having a heart and wealth so big, he announced, in the past, that he would be donating around $32 billion of his personal wealth to charity.

The generous Arab royal is the owner of the renowned Rotana enterprise, and rubs shoulders with the likes of Rupert Murdoch – since he is an investor in the media mogul’s news corporation. It doesn’t stop there as you may not know that Prince Alawaeed’s own investment company, Kingdom Holdings, has shares in these huge companies:

Citigroup
Back in 1991, Citigroup was not doing so well until the Saudi royal made his first acquisition with Citigroup.

Apple
It is a lesser known fact that Prince Alwaleed has been investing in Apple since 1997.

Saks 5th Avenue
The Arab prince has been investing in Saks 5th Avenue since 1993.

Twitter
Twitter being a huge digital social platform was most definitely a lucrative move as Prince Alwaleed has been investing in the company since 2011.

Four Seasons, Movenpick & Fairmont Hotels
Prince Alwaleed Talal’s investment firm, Kingdom Holdings owns the Movenpick and Fairmont hotel chains as well as a number of Four Seasons branches, as well as the fancy Savoy in London.

Disneyland Paris
Disneyland Paris has been a lucrative move for the royal as he has been investing in the company since 1994.

Time Warner
Kingdom Holdings has a 5 percent share in this huge media corp.

This article was first published in About Her

If you want more interesting news or videos of this website click on this link About Her Home

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Kingdom Holding leads post-Eid Tadawul trading surge

Time: 18 May 2021

Tadawul closed for the Eid Al-Fitr holiday on May 10, with trading resuming a week later on May 17. (Reuters)

This is despite the fact the company in March reported a net loss after Zakat

RIYADH: A total of 56 companies listed on the Saudi Exchange (Tadawul) were trading above their three-month averages on Tuesday, as the bourse reopened this week following the Eid Al-Fitr holiday.

Leading the pack was Kingdom Holding, the company controlled by Saudi Arabia’s Prince Alwaleed bin Talal.

According to data compiled by financial website Argaam, Kingdom Holding was trading 418 percent higher than its three-month trading average.

This is despite the fact the company in March reported a net loss after Zakat and tax of SR1.46 billion ($390 million) for 2020, compared with a profit of SR420.2 million the year before, a swing of 449.1 percent.

Second on the list was Etihad Atheeb Telecommunication Company, which was trading at 259 percent above its three-month average.

The telco in February reported a net profit after Zakat and tax of SR102.6 million for the nine months ending on Dec. 31 last year, compared with a loss of SR62.49 million for the same period in 2019, a swing of 264 percent.

Etihad Atheeb resumed trading on Tadawul on Feb. 14 after it was previously suspended in July 2018 for not disclosing financial results.

In total, 17 companies saw a triple digit percentage trading surge. Ranked third was Saudi Printing, up 215 percent, followed by the Al Abdullatif Industrial Investment Co (up 205 percent) and the Saudi Arabian Mining Company – Maaden (up 190 percent).

Tadawul closed for the Eid Al-Fitr holiday on May 10, with trading resuming a week later on May 17.

This article was first published in Arab News

If you want more interesting news or videos of this website click on this link  Arab News Home

Alwaleed Philanthropies & Princess Lamia launch brand to support female artisans

Time: 05 May 2021

SARAH JOSEPH

Alwaleed Philanthropies, founded by His Royal Highness Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal, has launched a new homegrown brand in support of Saudi female artisans.

The project entitled Mizwada is also being spearheaded by Alwaleed Philanthropies’ Secretary-General, Her Royal Highness Princess Lamia bint Majed Al Saud.

While being known for her role as a philanthropist in society, Princess Lamia has previously shared her desire to change the world, and the newly launched brand, Mizwada aims to work with female artisans in order to promote the concept of locally resources materials, which reflect the Kingdom’s heritage.

From creating purposeful goods to handcrafted lifestyle pieces, Mizwada stands as an ode to revive Saudi Arabia’s ancestral past by using products such as leather goods, woodwork, and ceramics, to reflect the main cultural symbolism.

Discussing the launch of Mizwada, Princess Lamia explained that there were key challenges that need to be addressed.

“Two key challenges are clear among this sector, unemployment, and the lack of adequate skills training,” she said. “We must work together to overcome these through programs that place women and girls at the heart of their initiatives.

“Our artisans produce products of a high quality and standard, with each product going through a lengthy process of quality control, resulting in products with the best quality and perfect finishing. They are modern objects, but do, however, translate our history and heritage.”

The brand was born with the purpose to preserve its traditional heritage, making it the perfect partnership between Alwaleed Philanthropies and Teeb, as they are a pioneer in supporting women in the region by providing them with economic opportunities by reaching more than 1 billion beneficiaries globally.

By collaborating with the local app in Saudi Arabia – PIK, the products can be purchased and delivered to customers in Riyadh city along with the Teeb online platform.

This article was first published in Emirates Woman

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Alwaleed Philanthropies and the Ministry of Health Launch Anti-Smoking Campaign across the Kingdom

Time: 31 May 2021

Your right to breathe – حقّك تتنفس

NEWS PROVIDED BY

Alwaleed Philanthropies

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia, May 31, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Alwaleed Philanthropies, chaired by HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Al Saud, and the Ministry of Health announced today they have joined forces to launch a two-year anti-smoking campaign, targeting smokers and non-smokers across the country. The partnership has come to fruition to address the prevalence and dangers of tobacco use as one of the major public health concerns in Saudi Arabia. The campaign is part of Saudi Arabia’s ambitious strategic tobacco control plan of reducing smoking rates from 19.8% to 8% and enhancing the quality of preventive and therapeutic health care services as a part of its Vision 2030.

Commenting on the partnership, HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Al Saud, Chairman of Alwaleed Philanthropies said, “We are determined to enhance the quality of lives of citizens and residents across the Kingdom and are pleased to be partnering with the Ministry of Health to reduce the prevalence of smoking and raise awareness of its dangers in Saudi Arabia. This partnership is very much in line with our commitment to making sustainable philanthropic investments to empower people, near and far.”

The first phase of the awareness campaign will target non-smokers, while the second phase will focus on smokers. Moreover, in an effort to identify violators of government anti-smoking regulations, Alwaleed Philanthropies and the Ministry of Health will be directing people to a mobile application to report and monitor violations of anti-smoking regulations, including smoking in public places, selling tobacco to minors and advertising cigarette or shisha smoking on television channels.

According to the World Health Organisation, the tobacco use epidemic is one of the major global public health challenges, causing over 7 million deaths due to smoking-related diseases each year, 70,000 of which are Saudi citizens[1]. A previous Saudi Health Information Survey revealed Saudi Arabia had a total of 5.5 million smokers, equating to 23% of the Kingdom’s population.

For four decades, Alwaleed Philanthropies has supported and spent more than 4 billion dollars on social welfare and initiated more than 1000 projects in over +189 countries, managed by 10 Saudi female members, reaching more than 1 billion beneficiaries around the world, regardless of gender, race, or religion. Alwaleed Philanthropies collaborates with a range of philanthropic, governmental, and educational organizations to combat poverty, empower women and youth, develop communities, provide disaster relief, and create cultural understanding through education. It seeks to build bridges for a more compassionate, tolerant, and accepting world.

[1] WHO EMRO | Combating tobacco use in Saudi Arabia: a review of recent initiatives | Volume 26 issue 7 | EMHJ volume 26 2020.

http://www.emro.who.int/emhj-volume-26-2020/volume-26-issue-7/combating-tobacco-use-in-saudi-arabia-a-review-of-recent-initiatives.html.

Photo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1522164/Alwaleed_Anti_Smoking.jpg

Related Links

https://alwaleedphilanthropies.org/

SOURCE Alwaleed Philanthropies

This article was first published in PR Newswire

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Revealed: Top 5 most powerful Arabs in Saudi Arabia

Time: 12 April 2021

The highest ranked Arabs originating from Saudi Arabia in Gulf Business’ annual Arab power list

BY GULF BUSINESS

Saudi nationals once again stood out as the second largest group in Gulf Business‘ annual Arab Power list for 2021, with the number of entries tallying 20 this year.

Leading from the front is the chair of the state-owned oil giant Saudi Aramco, while its CEO Amin Naseer also sat among the top five most powerful Arabs from the kingdom.

Lubna Suliman Olayan, chairperson of Saudi British Bank and a trailblazer in her own right, made it into the top five ranking.

Those on the list from the kingdom span across industries – from finance and energy to telecom.

1. Yasir Al-Rumayyan
Chairman, Aramco/Governor, PIF

Sector: Diversified
Overall rank: 1
2020 rank: 1

In what has been an incredibly tough year, one person who has been keenly investigating opportunities – backed by a massive pool of resources – is Yasir Al- Rumayyan, the governor and board member of the Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF). The kingdom’s sovereign wealth fund – among the world’s largest with roughly $400bn in assets – has been frequently making headlines as it snaps up investments in diverse sectors including video games and fintech.

Al-Rumayyan has also pledged that the fund will invest $40bn annually in the kingdom to boost the economy. Also chairman of the world’s biggest oil producer Saudi Aramco, Al-Rumayyan confirmed last month that the company still intends to sell more shares following its historic IPO in 2019, when it sold less than 2 per cent of its shares and raised $29.4bn. A close aide of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Al-Rumayyan also serves on the boards of Soft-Bank Group and Uber and chairs Sanabil Investments.

As Saudi Arabia embarks further on its ambitious Vision 2030 agenda, Al-Rumayyan will play a significant role in making that vision a reality.

2. Amin Nasser
President and CEO, Aramco

Sector: Energy
Overall rank: 7
2020 rank: 10

Calling the pandemic the “biggest crisis in a century” for the oil industry at a recent conference, Amin Nasser, CEO of the world’s biggest oil producer, however stressed that he was optimistic about demand recovering this year. He is also leading Saudi Aramco’s diversification into hydrogen and ammonia – it made the world’s first blue ammonia shipment from Saudi Arabia to Japan for use in power generation in 2020. In April last year, Aramco also achieved the highest single day crude oil production in its history, reaching up to 12.1 million barrels per day.

3. HRH Prince Alwaleed bin Talal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud
Chairman, Kingdom Holding Company

Sector: Finance
Overall rank: 10
2020 rank: 9

While the Saudi businessman’s Kingdom Holding has not been much in the news, the humanitarian organisation he chairs, Alwaleed Philanthropies has taken several initiatives in the past year including the allocation of up to $30m on various projects to combat the Covid-19 pandemic. It has also taken up educational and housing projects in Yemen.

Meanwhile his independent record label, Rotana Music, also announced in February that it had received an undisclosed amount of investment from Warner Music Group (WMG). The deal will see Rotana’s music released outside the region to a global audience.

4. Yousef Abdullah Al Benyan
Vice chairman and CEO, SABIC

Sector: Industry
Overall rank: 1
2020 rank: 1

Serving as the chair of the Business Twenty (B20) Saudi Arabia, Yousef Al Benyan led the two-day talks in the kingdom in October as global business leaders discussed and made policy recommendations to the G20 to reinvigorate the global economy and ensure inclusive growth. Meanwhile he also led petrochemicals heavyweight SABIC to post a profit in 2020, beating analyst expectations of a loss.

SABIC is “cautiously optimistic” for a gradual recovery in the year ahead, he said. Al Benyan also chairs Yansab, Nusaned and the Gulf Petrochemicals and Chemicals Association (GPCA).

5. Lubna Suliman Olayan
Chairperson, Saudi British Bank

Sector: Finance
Overall rank: 16
2020 rank: 11

Lubna Olayan, one of the region’s most influential businesswomen and the chairperson of Saudi British Bank (SABB) led the bank’s successful integration with Alawwal Bank, following their merger in 2018. Olayan became the first woman to chair a Saudi-listed company when she took on the role in 2018 and was reappointed for a three-year term in January 2020. A strong propagator for women empowerment in the kingdom, Olayan served as CEO of Olayan Financing Company for over 35 years, and presently chairs its executive committee and the Olayan Saudi Holding Company.

She also serves as a board member of Schlumberger.

This article was first published in Gulf Business

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Alwaleed Philanthropies and the World Scouting launch first scouting units for women in Saudi universities

14/03/2021

Alwaleed Philanthropies, chaired by HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Al Saud, signed two memorandums of cooperation (MoC), in collaboration with the World Scout Foundation to support women and youth involvement in scouting locally and internationally, and encourage greater participation in community volunteering within the higher education sector. The collaboration will support the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 goal of rallying one million individuals to volunteer per year.

The partnership agreements aim to align volunteering programs in the Saudi universities with the framework of the World Scouting as well as prepare students to participate in non-profit development projects. Furthermore, the programs will work to improve community engagement by forging partnerships with third-party institutions within the community to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

The newly launched initiative is the first in the Kingdom to build structured women and youth scout groups in Saudi universities. As part of the pilot phase, five universities are expected to be onboard in 2021, while further agreements will include more universities in Saudi Arabia as part of a broader scheme after this year. The first two agreements have been signed with Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University (PNU) and Prince Sultan University (PSU).

Emphasizing the importance of encouraging youth to participate in volunteering programs, HH Princess Sama bint Faisal Al Saud, Board Member of the World Scout Foundation and Head of the Saudi Girl Scouts Committee, said: “Our countries need to empower and encourage women and youth to contribute positively to the continuous growth and development of our societies.  Scouting is one of the most effective ways to develop the required skills, knowledge, and sense of responsibility to improve well-being of our local and global communities.”

HH Princess Sama bint Faisal Al Saud is the first Head of the Saudi Girl Scouts Committee, and has supported young women to participate in community engagement programs throughout the Kingdom.

Commenting on the announcement, HRH Princess Lamia bint Majed Saud Al Saud, Secretary General of Alwaleed Philanthropies, added: “Saudi women have a crucial role to play in the development of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the wider region. I strongly believe that empowering women and youth through volunteer programs has a ripple effect on families, communities, and countries, and can achieve long-lasting benefits and inspire other women, particularly young girls to participate in the society and drive environmental and economic progress in the Kingdom. We are proud to work with our partners to support the Kingdom in reaching 1 million volunteers per year, while simultaneously achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.”

For four decades, Alwaleed Philanthropies has supported and spent more than 4 billion dollars on social welfare and initiated more than 1000 projects in over +189 countries, managed by 10 Saudi female members, reaching more than 1 billion beneficiaries around the world, regardless of gender, race, or religion. Alwaleed Philanthropies collaborates with a range of philanthropic, governmental, and educational organizations to combat poverty, empower women and youth, develop communities, provide disaster relief, and create cultural understanding through education.

This article was first published in Alwaleed Philanthropies

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Warner Music buys stake in Saudi billionaire’s record label

16/02/2021

Rotana Music deal gives Warner rights to distribute releases by some of the Arab world’s biggest artists outside the Middle East

Warner Music Group Corp has acquired a stake in Saudi billionaire Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal’s Rotana Music, giving it rights to distribute releases by some of the Arab world’s biggest artists outside the Middle East.

The New York City-based entertainment publishing company, which owns hip-hop music labels Atlantic Records and Asylum Records, didn’t disclose details of the investment.

The deal involved Warner acquiring a significant minority stake in Rotana Music that valued the Middle East record label at about $200 million, according to a person familiar with the transaction.

Cementing the deal gives Alwaleed’s Rotana an infusion of cash and international distribution network for its stars, while Warner Music gets access to a young, tech-savvy region.

Alwaleed invested about $270 million into Deezer in 2018, a deal that also made available Rotana’s audio and video content for the music streaming service.

That investment was the first made by the prince after he was detained in 2017 in what the Saudi government described as a crackdown on corruption. He was released a few months later after signing a “confirmed understanding” with Saudi authorities.

Len Blavatnik, vice chairman of Warner Music, is also an investor in Deezer.

The deal would allow Warner to “both expand our profile in the region and to bring these amazing artists to audiences across the globe,” Simon Robson, the company’s president of international recorded music, said in a statement.

Kacy Grine, who’s previously worked with Prince Alwaleed on many of his previous investments, advised Rotana on the deal.

This article was first published in Arabian Business

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Kingdom Tower Lights up in Orange to Mark World Neglected Tropical Diseases Day

30/01/2021

Alwaleed Philanthropies (AP), chaired by HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal AlSaud, announced lighting up the iconic Kingdom Tower in Riyadh in orange Saturday, January 30th, to join the world in celebrating the second annual World Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD) Day.

From the Kingdom Tower in Saudi Arabia to the Colosseum in Rome, more than 50 landmarks representing over 25 nations across the world showcased their support on World NTD Day by lighting up the building “orange” in celebrating the progress of beating NTD. 1 in 5 people on the planet are affected by Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs), many of which can be prevented, eliminated or even eradicated with improved access to existing safe and cost-effective tools.

Alwaleed Philanthropies participated in NTD Day along side with partners in support of the projects that aim to eliminate these diseases such as, The Carter Center in Eradication of Guinea Worm project, the UNICEF in Measles and Rubella Elimination Project, The End Fund in the END of Diseases of Neglect Project, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Polio Eradication Fund.

For four decades, Alwaleed Philanthropies has supported and spent more than 4 billion dollars on social welfare and initiated more than 1000 projects in over +189 countries, managed by 10 Saudi female members, reaching more than 1 billion beneficiaries around the world, regardless of gender, race, or religion. Alwaleed Philanthropies collaborates with a range of philanthropic, governmental, and educational organizations to combat poverty, empower women and youth, develop communities, provide disaster relief, and create cultural understanding through education. It seeks to build bridges for a more compassionate, tolerant, and accepting world.

This article was first published in Alwaleed Philanthropies

If you want more interesting news or videos of this website click on this link  Alwaleed Philanthropies Home

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