How a young Saudi female broke into male-dominated environment

Time: 25 October 2020

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Al-Rammah is a commercial manager with GE Gas Power and said she had never felt inferior to her male coworkers despite being the only woman on the team. (Supplied)

  • Nour Al-Rammah wrote a manual for everything GE-related made simple for those with no engineering background

JEDDAH: Nour Al-Rammah never expected to work for GE Power because she lacked an engineering degree.

But the Al-Yamamah University graduate managed to overcome this hurdle through perseverance and resourcefulness, as well as writing a 400-page manual for others like her who wanted to work for one of the world’s biggest companies but did not have the technical background.
“I never saw myself reaching there,” she told Arab News, reflecting on her accomplishment of breaking into and succeeding in a competitive and male-dominated environment. “When I studied marketing at university, I expected to land in a marketing company, doing some public relations, marketing and advertising. But I ended up in an engineering company.”
She was born and raised in France until she completed her schooling, returning to Saudi Arabia after 17 years and settling in Riyadh. She attended Al-Yamamah University to study for a bachelor’s degree in business administration, majoring in marketing and finance.

FASTFACT

She was born and raised in France until she completed her schooling, returning to Saudi Arabia after 17 years and settling in Riyadh.

Her path to GE Power, which has been ranked in the Fortune Global 500, was not easy. She wanted to join the company’s elite leadership program, which only selects one candidate in the Kingdom every year. She was rejected the first time she applied. “It’s very difficult to join, and one of the major prerequisites is an engineering background.”
Before that she had taken up a sales and commercial internship with GE Power without really knowing much about the company and what it was offering in the market at the time, although she was familiar with its logo. She had several opportunities that presented themselves to her, but it was the GE Power internship that caught her attention.
“Today in Saudi Arabia, we have more than 500 GE turbines that generate over 50 percent of the Kingdom’s electricity. I could not reject such an offer. I wanted to explore the opportunity and I do not regret my decision.”

When I studied marketing at university, I expected to land in a marketing company, doing some public relations, marketing and advertising. But I ended up in an engineering company.

Nour Al-Rammah

Once the internship ended she could not envision herself working elsewhere, adding: “Because of the amazing experience I got, my objective was just (there’s) no way out. It’s either I take a full-time job in this company or whatever way I could to stay in the company, like extend the internship.”
To secure her position she wrote “Nour’s Book,” a manual for everything GE-related made simple for people without an engineering background.
“What inspired me to write Nour’s Book was to join the elite and most competitive commercial leader program, known as the CLP (Commercial Leadership Program) in GE. I felt so much empowerment to not let this (lack of engineering background) stop me, or be an impediment to me. Instead, I used this 400-page technical handbook to accelerate the technical learning curve, and I made it through the program thanks to the success of this book.”

The book discusses GE’s portfolio, products, gas turbines, commercial terms and conditions, customer requests, and acronyms across four chapters.
It is not available for purchase nor is it available to anyone except GE employees. Now, her book is often given to new employees upon entry as a manual.
Another reason she wrote the book was to transfer her knowledge to company newcomers, from trainees to employees.
“I wanted to leave a legacy, a footprint. What did Nour leave behind her to help all these new employees join the power business without having an engineering degree? If I did it, then everybody can do it.”
She also wanted to show GE Global how Saudi women had an opportunity to join the energy sector, achieving her goal through compiling articles, simplifying technical language, and attending internal courses. Whenever she came across something confusing, she would consult GE engineering experts around her or across the globe.

Al-Rammah is a commercial manager with GE Gas Power and said she had never felt inferior to her male coworkers despite being the only woman on the team.
“I feel the equality with my peers. Going to GE for me feels like going to my second home. Believe it or not, I spend more time at the office than I do with my family. I feel empowered by my male colleagues. When I ask for help, they always give me (more) than what I ask. If I need any explanations, they share documents or connect me to the right person. In meetings, my points are always taken into consideration. When I make mistakes, they correct me without leaving me intimidated or they call me after the meeting and correct me. They make sure that I always do better.”
She said that today’s Saudi Arabia was capable of empowering and inspiring women. “We do live in a country that gives golden opportunities to ambitious ladies.”

This article was first published in Arab News

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Saudi Arabia launches ‘make it green’ campaign to plant 10 million trees

11/10/20

Saudi Arabia loses 120,000 hectares of trees every year through destruction and the logging industry. (Supplied)

Saudi Arabia’s Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture launched the “Let’s make it green” campaign on Saturday – an initiative aimed at planting 10 million trees across the Kingdom.

Over the next six months, trees will be planted in approximately165 sites to tackle deforestation.

The campaign was launched with several Saudi ministries tweeting tree emojis in a push to promote the planting of trees in the Kingdom.

Saudi Arabia loses 120,000 hectares of trees every year through destruction and the logging industry.

 

The environment ministry explained that the campaign comes as part of its efforts to work on developing natural vegetation cover and restoring biological diversity in natural environments, as well as rehabilitating degraded vegetation sites.

The campaign also aims to promote positive behavior to preserve and protect the environment.

Trees and shrubs that are threatened with extinction due to overgrazing, logging and uprooting, as well as the urban expansion will also be planted,

The Ministry of Environment reported that the campaign also aims to create a number of national parks, to spread seeds in a number of areas, and to plant forests in the Najran and Al-Baha regions.

 

This article was first published in Arab News

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Ready, steady grow: Saudi tree-planting initiative seeks greener future for all

Time: 07 October 2020  

Nabatik aims to work with Eastern Province municipalities and plans on expanding to others across the Kingdom, teaming up with nurseries to develop their capabilities while also encouraging business people to invest in nurseries. (Shutterstock)

Through his campaign, Mohammed Al-Khalid wants people to plant trees. (Supplied)

Mohammed Al-Khalid. (Supplied)

  • An initiative from engineer Mohammed Al-Khalid, Nabatik works for buyers and businesses in the Kingdom

JEDDAH: Faced with swaths of emptiness across Saudi Arabia’s desert landscapes, entrepreneurs are embracing corporate social responsibility and doing their bit to protect the environment.

Nabatik, an initiative from engineer Mohammed Al-Khalid, wants to give people the opportunity to plant trees through just a few clicks while supporting nurseries in the Kingdom in the process.

Deforestation has increased CO2 emissions in the atmosphere and rising temperatures have shown how harmful the impact can be on ecosystems — increased water temperatures, record-breaking summer heat, strong and devastating storms. But there is a way to undo some of the damage.

“All it requires is one simple act — planting trees,” Al-Khalid told Arab News.

Trees can help mitigate the consequences of climate change as they have great potential for carbon sequestration and are often seen as the easiest and most affordable approach to address global warming.

Thousands of acres of forest are being cut down everyday, and studies show what will happen in the future if more trees are lost. These frightening scenarios have prompted NGOs, government agencies and businesses to see what they can do to protect the environment.

Trees can help offset the carbon footprint, lower temperatures, help with energy efficiency at home, purify the air and minimize dusting, said Al-Khalid. “A neighborhood full of trees is a healthy neighborhood with healthy residents. It shades those who walk and brings peace to their mind.”

Al-Khalid, who is from the Kingdom’s Eastern Province, planted his first tree 20 years ago while on a journey with his father. “I was very much interested in trees and plants as a kid and, upon returning to the same area where I planted my first sapling, I found a sprawling tree where I was able to protect myself from the searing sun under its shade. It stayed with me and gave me the idea to start a business.”

HIGHLIGHTS

• The goal of planting a million trees by 2030 will help the Saudi Vision 2030 reform plan for a greener Kingdom.

• Afforestation campaigns have been initiated since the launch of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s strategy, and Nabatik plans to play a role in this vision and make an impact on the Kingdom’s biodiversity.

“We, the youth, are the custodians of the future and it is our obligation to ensure that we live on this Earth sustainably in order for future generations to thrive and prosper. There’s no question that trees and forests in the Kingdom should not be considered a secondary need anymore. They’re becoming a necessity, especially in a time where climate change might become an irreversible reality.”

He explained that the benefits of trees for livable and sustainable communities could be achieved by planting trees in urban neighborhoods and parks.

The Nabatik platform works for the buyer’s convenience.

Customers can choose from neem trees, ficus religiosa, bougainvilleas, bonsiana, giant lemon trees and more. The trees are delivered to people’s homes and planted. Customers will soon get the option to have the trees cared for to ensure greater longevity.

The trees on the website have been chosen for their ecological and economic viability. They can cope with harsh conditions, low water consumption and they cause no harm to infrastructure. They have a high carbon absorption and, at the same time, beautify urban areas and homes.

“The topic of sustainability is one of major concern on many forums, a daily point of discussion globally. Many Saudis have taken into consideration how to include sustainability in their business plans.”

The goal of planting a million trees by 2030 will help the Saudi Vision 2030 reform plan for a greener Kingdom.

Afforestation campaigns have been initiated since the launch of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s strategy, and Nabatik plans to play a role in this vision and make an impact on the Kingdom’s biodiversity.

Nabatik aims to work with Eastern Province municipalities and plans on expanding to others across the Kingdom, teaming up with nurseries to develop their capabilities while also encouraging businesspeople to invest in nurseries as growing and profitable ventures.

“The more businesses thrive, the higher the supply and demand would be,” Al-Khalid added.

This article was first published in Arab News

If you want more interesting news or videos of this website click on this link  Arab News Home